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Changes: Sugar caramelization

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Sugar may be caramelized in a pot/pan, or in a box cooker. The usual temperatures in standard cookbooks, etc. are a bit too high; the slow heating of solar cookers means more time is spent at a given temperature, so various stages of caramelization actually happen at lower temperatures than on a conventional stovetop. Roughly, browning (in a box cooker) begins at 285<sup>o</sup>F (140<sup>o</sup>C) and 300-315<sup>o</sup>F (149-157<sup>o</sup>C) is hot enough to burn it.
 
Sugar may be caramelized in a pot/pan, or in a box cooker. The usual temperatures in standard cookbooks, etc. are a bit too high; the slow heating of solar cookers means more time is spent at a given temperature, so various stages of caramelization actually happen at lower temperatures than on a conventional stovetop. Roughly, browning (in a box cooker) begins at 285<sup>o</sup>F (140<sup>o</sup>C) and 300-315<sup>o</sup>F (149-157<sup>o</sup>C) is hot enough to burn it.
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[[Category:Foods]]

Latest revision as of 18:39, October 20, 2013


Sugar may be caramelized in a pot/pan, or in a box cooker. The usual temperatures in standard cookbooks, etc. are a bit too high; the slow heating of solar cookers means more time is spent at a given temperature, so various stages of caramelization actually happen at lower temperatures than on a conventional stovetop. Roughly, browning (in a box cooker) begins at 285oF (140oC) and 300-315oF (149-157oC) is hot enough to burn it.

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